Classic

rpyc.utils.classic.connect_channel(channel)[source]

Creates an RPyC connection over the given channel

Parameters:channel – the rpyc.core.channel.Channel instance
Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.connect_stream(stream)[source]

Creates an RPyC connection over the given stream

Parameters:channel – the rpyc.core.stream.Stream instance
Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.connect_stdpipes()[source]

Creates an RPyC connection over the standard pipes (stdin and stdout)

Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.connect_pipes(input, output)[source]

Creates an RPyC connection over two pipes

Parameters:
  • input – the input pipe
  • output – the output pipe
Returns:

an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService

rpyc.utils.classic.connect(host, port=18812, ipv6=False, keepalive=False)[source]

Creates a socket connection to the given host and port.

Parameters:
  • host – the host to connect to
  • port – the TCP port
  • ipv6 – whether to create an IPv6 socket or IPv4
Returns:

an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService

rpyc.utils.classic.unix_connect(path)[source]

Creates a socket connection to the given host and port.

Parameters:path – the path to the unix domain socket
Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.ssl_connect(host, port=18821, keyfile=None, certfile=None, ca_certs=None, cert_reqs=None, ssl_version=None, ciphers=None, ipv6=False)[source]

Creates a secure (SSL) socket connection to the given host and port, authenticating with the given certfile and CA file.

Parameters:
  • host – the host to connect to
  • port – the TCP port to use
  • ipv6 – whether to create an IPv6 socket or an IPv4 one

The following arguments are passed directly to ssl.wrap_socket:

Parameters:
  • keyfile – see ssl.wrap_socket. May be None
  • certfile – see ssl.wrap_socket. May be None
  • ca_certs – see ssl.wrap_socket. May be None
  • cert_reqs – see ssl.wrap_socket. By default, if ca_cert is specified, the requirement is set to CERT_REQUIRED; otherwise it is set to CERT_NONE
  • ssl_version – see ssl.wrap_socket. The default is PROTOCOL_TLSv1
  • ciphers – see ssl.wrap_socket. May be None. New in Python 2.7/3.2
Returns:

an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService

rpyc.utils.classic.ssh_connect(remote_machine, remote_port)[source]

Connects to the remote server over an SSH tunnel. See rpyc.utils.factory.ssh_connect() for more info.

Parameters:
  • remote_machine – the plumbum.remote.RemoteMachine instance
  • remote_port – the remote TCP port
Returns:

an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService

rpyc.utils.classic.connect_subproc(server_file=None)[source]

Runs an RPyC classic server as a subprocess and returns an RPyC connection to it over stdio

Parameters:server_file – The full path to the server script (rpyc_classic.py). If not given, which rpyc_classic.py will be attempted.
Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.connect_thread()[source]

Starts a SlaveService on a thread and connects to it. Useful for testing purposes. See rpyc.utils.factory.connect_thread()

Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.connect_multiprocess(args={})[source]

Starts a SlaveService on a multiprocess process and connects to it. Useful for testing purposes and running multicore code thats uses shared memory. See rpyc.utils.factory.connect_multiprocess()

Returns:an RPyC connection exposing SlaveService
rpyc.utils.classic.upload(conn, localpath, remotepath, filter=None, ignore_invalid=False, chunk_size=16000)[source]

uploads a file or a directory to the given remote path

Parameters:
  • localpath – the local file or directory
  • remotepath – the remote path
  • filter – a predicate that accepts the filename and determines whether it should be uploaded; None means any file
  • chunk_size – the IO chunk size
rpyc.utils.classic.download(conn, remotepath, localpath, filter=None, ignore_invalid=False, chunk_size=16000)[source]

download a file or a directory to the given remote path

Parameters:
  • localpath – the local file or directory
  • remotepath – the remote path
  • filter – a predicate that accepts the filename and determines whether it should be downloaded; None means any file
  • chunk_size – the IO chunk size
rpyc.utils.classic.upload_package(conn, module, remotepath=None, chunk_size=16000)[source]

uploads a module or a package to the remote party

Parameters:
  • conn – the RPyC connection to use
  • module – the local module/package object to upload
  • remotepath – the remote path (if None, will default to the remote system’s python library (as reported by distutils)
  • chunk_size – the IO chunk size

Note

upload_module is just an alias to upload_package

example:

import foo.bar
...
rpyc.classic.upload_package(conn, foo.bar)
rpyc.utils.classic.upload_module(conn, module, remotepath=None, chunk_size=16000)

uploads a module or a package to the remote party

Parameters:
  • conn – the RPyC connection to use
  • module – the local module/package object to upload
  • remotepath – the remote path (if None, will default to the remote system’s python library (as reported by distutils)
  • chunk_size – the IO chunk size

Note

upload_module is just an alias to upload_package

example:

import foo.bar
...
rpyc.classic.upload_package(conn, foo.bar)
rpyc.utils.classic.obtain(proxy)[source]

obtains (copies) a remote object from a proxy object. the object is pickled on the remote side and unpickled locally, thus moved by value. changes made to the local object will not reflect remotely.

Parameters:proxy – an RPyC proxy object

Note

the remote object to must be pickle-able

Returns:a copy of the remote object
rpyc.utils.classic.deliver(conn, localobj)[source]

delivers (recreates) a local object on the other party. the object is pickled locally and unpickled on the remote side, thus moved by value. changes made to the remote object will not reflect locally.

Parameters:
  • conn – the RPyC connection
  • localobj – the local object to deliver

Note

the object must be picklable

Returns:a proxy to the remote object
rpyc.utils.classic.redirected_stdio(*args, **kwds)[source]

Redirects the other party’s stdin, stdout and stderr to those of the local party, so remote IO will occur locally.

Example usage:

with redirected_stdio(conn):
    conn.modules.sys.stdout.write("hello\n")   # will be printed locally
rpyc.utils.classic.pm(conn)[source]

same as pdb.pm() but on a remote exception

Parameters:conn – the RPyC connection
rpyc.utils.classic.interact(conn, namespace=None)[source]

remote interactive interpreter

Parameters:
  • conn – the RPyC connection
  • namespace – the namespace to use (a dict)
class rpyc.utils.classic.MockClassicConnection[source]

Mock classic RPyC connection object. Useful when you want the same code to run remotely or locally.

rpyc.utils.classic.teleport_function(conn, func)[source]

“Teleports” a function (including nested functions/closures) over the RPyC connection. The function is passed in bytecode form and reconstructed on the other side.

The function cannot have non-brinable defaults (e.g., def f(x, y=[8]):, since a list isn’t brinable), or make use of non-builtin globals (like modules). You can overcome the second restriction by moving the necessary imports into the function body, e.g.

def f(x, y):
    import os
    return (os.getpid() + y) * x
Parameters:
  • conn – the RPyC connection
  • func – the function object to be delivered to the other party

Helpers

Helpers and wrappers for common RPyC tasks

rpyc.utils.helpers.buffiter(obj, chunk=10, max_chunk=1000, factor=2)[source]

Buffered iterator - reads the remote iterator in chunks starting with chunk, multiplying the chunk size by factor every time, as an exponential-backoff, up to a chunk of max_chunk size.

buffiter is very useful for tight loops, where you fetch an element from the other side with every iterator. Instead of being limited by the network’s latency after every iteration, buffiter fetches a “chunk” of elements every time, reducing the amount of network I/Os.

Parameters:
  • obj – An iterable object (supports iter())
  • chunk – the initial chunk size
  • max_chunk – the maximal chunk size
  • factor – the factor by which to multiply the chunk size after every iterator (up to max_chunk). Must be >= 1.
Returns:

an iterator

Example:

cursor = db.get_cursor()
for id, name, dob in buffiter(cursor.select("Id", "Name", "DoB")):
    print id, name, dob
rpyc.utils.helpers.restricted(obj, attrs, wattrs=None)[source]

Returns a ‘restricted’ version of an object, i.e., allowing access only to a subset of its attributes. This is useful when returning a “broad” or “dangerous” object, where you don’t want the other party to have access to all of its attributes.

New in version 3.2.

Parameters:
  • obj – any object
  • attrs – the set of attributes exposed for reading (getattr) or writing (setattr). The same set will serve both for reading and writing, unless wattrs is explicitly given.
  • wattrs – the set of attributes exposed for writing (setattr). If None, wattrs will default to attrs. To disable setting attributes completely, set to an empty tuple ().
Returns:

a restricted view of the object

Example:

class MyService(rpyc.Service):
    def exposed_open(self, filename):
        f = open(filename, "r")
        return rpyc.restricted(f, {"read", "close"})   # disallow access to `seek` or `write`
rpyc.utils.helpers.async(proxy)[source]

Creates an async proxy wrapper over an existing proxy. Async proxies are cached. Invoking an async proxy will return an AsyncResult instead of blocking

class rpyc.utils.helpers.timed(proxy, timeout)[source]

Creates a timed asynchronous proxy. Invoking the timed proxy will run in the background and will raise an rpyc.core.async.AsyncResultTimeout exception if the computation does not terminate within the given time frame

Parameters:
  • proxy – any callable RPyC proxy
  • timeout – the maximal number of seconds to allow the operation to run
Returns:

a timed wrapped proxy

Example:

t_sleep = rpyc.timed(conn.modules.time.sleep, 6) # allow up to 6 seconds
t_sleep(4) # okay
t_sleep(8) # will time out and raise AsyncResultTimeout
class rpyc.utils.helpers.BgServingThread(conn, callback=None)[source]

Runs an RPyC server in the background to serve all requests and replies that arrive on the given RPyC connection. The thread is started upon the the instantiation of the BgServingThread object; you can use the stop() method to stop the server thread

Example:

conn = rpyc.connect(...)
bg_server = BgServingThread(conn)
...
bg_server.stop()

Note

For a more detailed explanation of asynchronous operation and the role of the BgServingThread, see Part 5: Asynchrounous Operation and Events

stop()[source]

stop the server thread. once stopped, it cannot be resumed. you will have to create a new BgServingThread object later.